Building stronger bonds by sharing family values

Posts tagged ‘stepfamilies’

God Knows What You’re Going Through


 

I'm Not Deaf!

Purpose of your problems and difficulties

For our light and momentary troubles are achieving for us an eternal glory that for outweighs them all.” 1 Corinthians 4:17 (NIV)

 “What is the purpose of your problems and difficulties? God wants you to learn something. Every storm is a school. Every trial is a teacher. Every experience is an education. Every difficulty is for your development.

 Most of us are slow learners. If you don’t learn something the first time, God will bring it up again in your life. It will come back because God is more interested in your character than he is in your comfort. He is more interested in making you like Christ than he is making things easy for you.” Rick Warren

 You may be facing a major difficulty right now: an illness, financial problem, strain in a relationship or just a day-to-day struggle. Does God have a message for you while you’re going through your difficulties? Yes, he will never leave you or forsake you. Stay encouraged and get connect?

Grandparents as Caregivers


This article is worth noting!

Grandparents are our connection to the past, and often the key to what shapes our future. Grandparents are our history, and we, in turn, are reflections of their lives and experiences. Grandparents set the values and standards by which families live, and it is through traditions that are passed along through generations by grandparents that families remain strong and together. Something as simple as a special family recipe or an annual family reunion can serve to remind us of the importance of our own heritage and our grandparents’ role in preserving it.
In the United States today, there are approximately 5.8 million grandparents living with a #grandchild. Of that number, 2.4 million grandparents ­ mostly grandmothers ­ are the primary caregivers of grandchildren, providing for most of their basic needs when their own parents cannot. Many of these grandparents have not planned to take on these responsibilities having already raised their families. But they gladly take on the challenges nonetheless, often at great personal sacrifice to their own physical, emotional and financial health.

The Administration on #Aging’s National Family Caregiver Support Program provides support for grandparents who are raising their young grandchildren. All too often, grandparents do not know where to turn, and are in need of basic information as well as counseling, support and respite. I am so proud that the National Family Caregiver Support Program is beginning to make a difference in the lives of grandparents across the country. 

The opportunity to develop and expand innovative and supportive programs to assist families and informal caregivers of grandparents and older relatives who are #caregivers of children, has led to exciting innovations in Arizona, Illinois, New York and Pennsylvania:

United Cerebral Palsy of Southern Arizona is increasing services to grandparents and older caregivers who are raising children with mental retardation or developmental disabilities by providing paid vouchers as a mechanism to streamline access to services. 

The Illinois Department on Aging is providing supportive services to frail, older caregivers, who are the parent, legal guardian or family member caring for an adult child with developmental disabilities. 

Catholic Charities of the Diocese of Rochester, New York, is collaborating with 15 national and local organizations to create a Kinship Care Network to help relative caregivers of grandchildren develop knowledge and skills and to improve family stability by resolving legal, financial, health and other problems the family may identify. 

The Pennsylvania Department of Aging is implementing a support system for older caregivers of adult children with mental retardation or developmental disabilities to reimburse consumers for expenditures related to caregiving and provide resources for all caregiving needs.

As we continue to explore new ways of improving service components for grandparent caregivers, it is my hope that we learn from these and similar innovations and share that knowledge and experience throughout the aging network. The challenges faced by grandparents who are raising their grandchildren can be daunting, but they are surmountable. As we reach each milestone, we become one step closer to our vision of a society that is increasingly aware of the importance of supporting grandparents who are caregivers. 

Where to Go for Help:

State and Area Agencies on Aging and local community service providers across the country have instituted programs and services to assist grandparent caregivers. Other important programs offered around the country include respite services and support groups. 

To learn about grandparent caregiver resources in your community use the Eldercare Locator at 1-800-677-1116 to contact your local Area Agency. An extensive list of resources and valuable links is also available on the Administration on Aging web site: http://www.aoa.gov.

 Grandparents as Caregivers

By Josefina G. Carbonell

Modern Day Family Pt2


Blended Families face Unique Challenges

The image of the traditional American family — the nuclear family of the Clevers and Huxtables — was once limited to mom, dad, and children living happily together under roof. Today the notion of a typical family has gradually expanded to included blended families of stepparents and stepchildren, like the Bradys and the Kardashians.

Blended families are one of the fastest growing segments of families in the United States, but unlike the nicely packaged problems seen on Television, these families struggle with issues that are anything but easy.  Major issues that newly blended families face include integrating discipline styles and coping with strong emotions, while at the same time building new relationships from scratch.

“It’s hard to step out of that role – am I a friend or am I a parent? But as an adult, you’re the parent, you have to discipline because there are going to be times that they’re with you alone,” said New York psychologist Dr. Janet Taylor in an interview with “Good Morning America.”

“Come from a nurturing standpoint, where you teach them responsibility, but do it from a place of love.”

Yes, love is a key factor but the major role begins with the new couple and what they have agreed upon before they said I do.  If you begin to look at why the child or children are acting out, you may have a better understand on how to solve the issues at hand.  First they have suffered a great loss in loosing the other parent and secondly adjustment doesn’t come over night.  Continue to esteem your mate but at the same time don’t stop showing affection for all your children.

David A. Harris-Gavin

 

 

Family Drama


Every family has drama, how you deal with this dramatic experience will leave you one of several ways.  Depressed, anger, having negative thoughts, or maybe walking out.  Yes you may add to the list!  Point being, you’re not in this alone.  The stage has now been set, dad has had a bad day at work, same for mom at home, little Johnny or Jane at school and home is the battleground.

Here’s a thought:  Someone needs to take charge, will it be you or the kids?

If you have never been hated by your child you have never been a parent.  ~Bette Davis

The Prodigal Son


Your son will return but will you receive him with open arms.  The Prodigal Son (Luke 15:11-32) gives us God’s response to a rebellious child. Possibly the hardest guideline to follow in this story is how the father allowed his son to take his inheritance and make his own choices. He did not run after his son and beg him to return, nor did he continually berate him for his foolish ways. His son was of age and solely responsible for his actions (Deuteronomy 24:16, Proverbs 1:29-31). This doesn’t mean that the father didn’t love his son. In verse 20 we are told that he saw his son returning from along way off. This implies that his father was watching for his son daily, dearly hoping for him to return and repent. This is not easy but, if we have shared the Gospel and the instructions that the Bible has given us with our children, the final decision to live a Godly life lies with each individual.

 

A Measure of Grace


My biological mother passed some 14 years ago and during her sickness my stepmother always made herself available.  Now, I’m older, wiser and truly understand the importance of family.

My stepmother loves me unconditionally just like the Lord; despite my faults.  Now, it’s my turn to be a blessing to her by assisting my half-siblings to care give for her.  Oh, what a blessing…

Can you forget about yourself and bless a family member in spite of how they may have treated you growing up?  Just a thought!

Blended Family Barrier


Blended families have several challenges and barriers.  One serious problem that escalates out of control is the way the new husband and wife feels about their kid(s).   Better known as the Kid Factor!  Each is committed to his or her own flesh and blood, while they’re merely acquainted with the other(s).  The problem is when kid(s) sense tension between the parents, they will use it as an opportunity to exploit the situation to their advantage.  Therefore, set boundaries for both sets of siblings.  Discuss between husband and wife who should handle the discipline and how.  Then share these new rules with everyone.  I like to call the Barrier Dissolver!  Just remember love is the key to barrier breaker.

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